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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010 edited
     
    HERE'S OUR TOP TEN GRAPHIC NOVELS OF 2010.
    They're all on display behind the counter at OK Comics. If you disagree with any of our choices, please feel free to post your own recommendations and mini reviews here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    1. American Vampire
    By Scott Snyder, Stephen King and Rafael Albuquerque
    The story of 20th Century America, from wild west, to the roaring 20's and onto the great depression, told from the point of view of a few immortal vampires.
    Great action adventure with a larger story bubbling under the surface.
    http://www.leedsguide.co.uk/review/comic-effect/american-vampire/17309
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    2. Market Day
    By James Sturm
    Mendleman is a craftsman who takes great care and pride in the rugs he makes. Market Day tells of how he is forced to realise that his exquisite product may be something from a bygone age, when his usual outlets refuse to stock his carpets in favour of cheaper, substandard copies.
    http://www.leedsguide.co.uk/review/comic-effect/market-day/15206
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    3. Wolverine Weapon X: Tomorrow Dies Today
    By Jason Aaron and Ron Garney
    What a great, fun action adventure superhero comic! Wolverine and Captain America's boozy night out is interrupted by Deathlok's, killing machines with no remorse, sent back in time to kill the potential leader of a future resistance.
    It may not be the most original premise ever, but Jason Aaron takes the basic Terminator concept, adds a few Marvel characters, and blows it up.
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    4. Wilson
    By Dan Clowes
    Wilson is a horrible man, so it’s no surprise that he’s completely friendless and alone. This tale of how he tries to rebuild the family that slipped through his grasp years ago is told in short one or two-page bursts, each chapter adopting a different visual style that either complements or contrasts with the story. But can we trust our narrator? Wilson lies to the people around him, and to himself. Perhaps he’s lying to us too.
    http://www.leedsguide.co.uk/review/comic-effect/wilson-dan-clowes-12.99-jonathan-cape/15464
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    5. It Was the War of the Trenches
    By Jacques Tardi
    Trenches is a very well researched, historically accurate First World War book. Trusting Tardi’s renditions of tanks, artillery, uniforms and the trenches themselves is instantaneous, he can draw anything, and he obviously puts the effort in to make sure he’s drawing everything right.
    There’s no one single story here, instead a series of short monologues from French soldiers, fictional and real, builds up an image of life on the front line.
    http://www.leedsguide.co.uk/review/comic-effect/it-was-the-war-of-the-trenches/14659
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    6. Batman and Robin: Batman Reborn
    By Grant Morrison, Frank Quitely and Phillip Tan
    Bruce Wayne is dead, and the original Robin, Dick Grayson in now The Batman. The real highlight of this book is the new Robin, Damian Wayne, Bruce's long lost, recently returned son. He's a ten year old trained assassin, and he's constantly in a mood. Grant Morrison draws heavily on your favourite comics of yesteryear, updating crazy 50's and 60's concepts for a new generation.
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    7. Parker: The Outfit
    By Darwyne Cooke
    Cooke’s latest graphic novel adapting Richard Stark’s 1960’s crime novel, Parker: The Outfit is pure 1960's cool. Parker’s still on the run from the organised crime outfit that wouldn’t pay him what they owed in the first book, The Hunter. But this time he decides to take the fight to them, using his own criminal connections to rip off their unlawful enterprises across the US.
    http://www.leedsguide.co.uk/review/comic-effect/parker-the-outfit/17394
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    8. Mercury
    By Hope Larson
    It's a tale of two young women, Josie, who lives on a farm in 1850's Nova Scotia and Tara Fraser lives in the same small town one hundred and fifty years later. Larson switches between the two stories really comfortably, using both girls to illustrate the massive differences between frontier life and that of the modern world, and also to highlight the similarities facing two young women coming of age.
    Separate yarns to start with, but the threads of both weave together as the actions of Josie have a huge impact on Tara.
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    9. How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less
    By Sarah Glidden
    Sarah Glidden is a non-political Jew, with a goy boyfriend, who wants to challenge her perceptions of Israel so she embarks upon a "Birthright" tour, an all expenses paid trip of Israel offered by the country in order to entice Jews to live there. Any political comics journalism is going to be compared to the work of Joe Sacco, but Sarah Glidden's work, both in form and content, is quite different, she is an insider (albeit a sceptical one) and her art eschews the alternative/underground style of Sacco's work for a more European Ligne-Claire style. Glidden presents the facts and events of her tour around Israel's cultural and historical landmarks as she experiences them, talking with government officials and ordinary civilians equally, offering her viewpoint occasionally but also playing devils advocate, which is impressive as Israel can be a sensitive subject for which it is almost incapable to being biased about. By the end Glidden refuses to be reductionist about Israel or to summarise the tour for her friends in America, instead allowing the events that we have read about speak for themselves.
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeNov 18th 2010
     
    10. Hellblazer: Pandemonium
    By Jamie Delano and Jock
    Modern day magician and aging Britt-Punk John Constantine is press ganged by the British Military and transported to war battered Iraq. The army have come across an enemy they can't fight, an ancient evil demon, so they need John's reluctant help to sort it out. Jocks artwork is the usual high standard, but it's the solid, intelligent dialogue that make this book stand out. Original Hellblazer writer Delano returns the character he defined and shows the recent upstarts how it's done.
  1.  
    Psst!

    Love And Rockets New Stories #3 by The Hernandez Siblings

    MOME #19 by Sundry Talented Persons

    DONG XOAI, VIETNAM 1965 by Mr. Joseph Kubert

    Acme Novelty Library #20: LINT! by Mr. Chris Ware

    You're okay with leaving those off, right? I mean I'm not judging(*) I'm just checking.

    (*) Or am I!
    • CommentAuthorgreg75
    • CommentTimeDec 21st 2010
     
    I'm going to recommend Y The Last Man On Earth book ten there isn't many graphics that bring a tear to my eye but this was unashamedly one of them.
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      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2010
     
    If Acme Novelty Lint came out before I'd put the list together it would have definitely bumped something.
    Y The Last Man is a great series and book 10 may have made this list, but it came out in 2008.

    Did anybody else notice that Leeds Guide Top Ten Graphic Novels of 2010 is exactly the same as OK Comics Top Ten Graphic Novels of 2010?
  2.  
    Well, fancy that!

    Just to add - what a great year for comics 2010 really was.
    •  
      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2010
     
    Agreed. The best single year for new comics and graphic novels. Ever.
    • CommentAuthorLee
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2010
     
    Surely 1963 was better?
  3.  
    The Alan Moore Image comic series?
    • CommentAuthorLee
    • CommentTimeJan 1st 2011
     
    Fool.
    •  
      CommentAuthorOK Comics
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2011
     
    The seeds may have been planted in 1963, but only now can we see the orchard in fool bloom, every branch hanging low with swollen fruit.